THREE LOST BOYS OF SHARPSVILLE

There wasn’t much that was scary in 1950s Sharpsville – maybe watching a horror film at the Ritz (remember “Attack of the Giant Leeches,” 1959?) or the Cold War but that didn’t seem to be part of our everyday lives. Even so, like any place in the world and at any time in history, we weren’t entirely free of events that caused great anxiety.

Here are two stories that momentarily caused quite a panic in our small town in the days of my childhood. (Don’t worry, the endings are happy ones!)


Turmoil at the Oak Street Tunnel

William DeVaux McLean III. Source: Sharpsville (PA) High School yearbook, Devils Log 1958.

George Reid. Source: Varsity “S” photograph in Sharpsville (PA) High School Devils Log, 1957.

“Hey, I know what we can do!” When two young boys, 10 and 12 years of age, are looking for an after-school adventure you know that trouble could be brewing. In this case, the older boy was George Reid, son of Mr. and Mrs. A.M. Reid of Hazen Road, and the younger, William DeVaux McLean III, the son of Councilman and Mrs. W.D. McLean Jr., who lived on Oak Street. It was early spring 1950 and the weather was finally turning warm enough to inspire outdoor exploits.

They decided to explore a tunnel on Oak Street, a dark, dank underground passageway that must have long intrigued them. One can imagine that they were planning the operation all day at school so that, as they readied themselves at home, they knew exactly what to do: change from their school clothes to old blue jeans and shirts, pack a bag with a flashlight and other needs and tell their parents where they were headed.

As an eerily quiet afternoon faded into evening and dinner was served, there was no trace of the boys. Finally, Councilman McLean decided it was time go outside and check on them. Calling into the tunnel from both of its openings, he received no response. Alarmed that the water in the tunnel was a little higher than usual, he realized the situation was getting serious. He decided to enter the tunnel and quickly procured hip boots and old clothes from the nearby Donner Service Station.

Meanwhile, the police and fire departments had been called and arrived within ten minutes to aid in the search. They lifted the tunnel’s manhole cover and Councilman McLean lowered himself in, followed by the Police Chief Walter Karsonovich and several firemen.

While the searchers were sloshing through the tunnel for almost an hour, looking for signs of the boys and calling out their names, the police cars and firetrucks had attracted a crowd of curious neighbors. Unnoticed at the edge of the crowd were the two missing youngsters who had stopped by to see what all the commotion was about. The Sharon Herald reported that they “gave themselves up” to the relief — and exasperation — of all those present. George and DeVaux explained that they had changed their plans and explored the woods and creek at Pine Hollow instead.

–Source: “Boys Join Crowd Watching Search for Them in Tunnel,” The Sharon Herald, April 4, 1950.

Vexation on Veteran’s Day

Patrick Angel, 1955. Source: Sharpsville (PA) Elementary School 2nd grade class photo.

On a chilly November 11, 1955, the Veteran’s Day Parade on Main Street was just winding down. It had included a group of handsomely uniformed Canadian boys who played instruments in the Governor-General’s Horse Guard, a group that particularly fascinated my girlfriends and me. But another event occurred that tempered our enthrallment. My mother, having found me in the dispersing crowd, informed me that she had sent my 5-year-old brother Patrick home, thinking I was there. She became very upset when she returned home later and discovered that he had taken off his hat, gloves and coat, then disappeared. 

Dutifully, my friend and I began searching for Pat in the neighborhood, although too often distracted by one or another of the Horse Guard marchers milling about. We met up with a group of other girlfriends on the corner of Main and Third streets which by now also included a couple of those uniformed cadets. Just then my dad showed up and berated me for not looking for my brother. Feeling guilty and quite embarrassed, I quickly walked home to find a nearly hysterical mother, tearfully promising that if her son is found she would “never go anywhere again, just stay home and watch him!”

I resumed my search outside, joining most of the neighborhood in looking for my little brother. Over 60 years later, Patrick can still recall the rest of the story: “Mom got a call from Aunt Mabel just as I was waking up. It was the telephone that woke me. I remember crawling out from behind the couch and hearing Mom crying to Aunt Mabel that I had been kidnapped.”

When Mom heard a little voice crying out “Ma!” she turned to see that he was safe and sound! The joy that Pat was found was not only felt by his immediate family, but also by the many neighbors who were calling for updates. We concluded later that Pat must have hidden when he found no-one home since was afraid to be alone in the dark.

With that episode at an end, I returned to my friends and spent the rest of the evening becoming better acquainted with the members of the Horse Guards and temporarily forgetting the troubles of the day.

Where They Are Now

After having been lost boys, these youngsters found out three things. One, that there are people who deeply care that you are gone. Two, they will try very hard to find you. And, three, they are both happy and irked once you are found. These lessons must have stayed with them the rest of their lives as they successfully pursued their careers, married and raised their own children and never went missing again!

William DeVaux McLean III (SHS 1958) currently lives in Land O’ Lakes, Florida. He is president of ProDial, Inc., a telecommunications company. DeVaux and his wife Marjorie have 3 children, 4 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren.

Patrick Nicholas Angel (SHS 1960-1964), lives in London, Kentucky, where he works for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM). Dr. Angel serves as senior forester and soil scientist for OSM, where he promotes reforestation partnerships on surface mines through the Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative. Patrick and Glenna have 5 children and 3 grandchildren.

See Also The Day the Canadians Came to Town

–Ann Angel Eberhardt (SHS 1958), Goodyear, AZ, with help from
William DeVaux McLean III (SHS 1958), Land O’ Lakes, FL,
who submitted 
The Sharon Herald article,
and Patrick Angel (SHS 1960-1964), London, KY.


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